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Boosterrific.com: The Complete, Annotated Adventures of Booster Gold
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Showing posts 5-10 of 43 matching: interview

Friday, June 7, 2019

Clean Your Room or Taste Laser

Eric Martsolf has been playing Brady Black on the daytime soap opera Days of Our Lives since 2008. But Booster Gold fans know him better as the only person to date to play a live action Booster Gold on television.

Martsolf was recently interviewed by Canadian television website, GlobalTV.com, where he doubled down on his earlier comments about the legacy of playing Booster Gold.

GlobalTV.com: From playing various roles in shows such as Days of Our Lives, Passions, and Global's own NCIS, what has been your favourite role to date?

Eric: Besides Brady Black it would have to be Booster Gold from the Smallville series because I got to fly. I got to show Clark Kent how to be Superman and it was just cool. I got a lot of credit with my kids because at the age that they were at, they truly believed that I could shoot lasers out of my wrists and if they misbehaved they thought I was going to shoot a laser at them. That role has just given me a lot back.

Booster Gold is the role that keeps on giving.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: eric martsolf globaltv.com interview smallville television

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

For Your Consideration

Westfield Comics has posted an article detailing the origins of Booster Gold Volume 1 in advance of the reprinting of those issues for the upcoming Booster Gold: The Big Fall hardcover.

The article was written by Robert Greenberger, a former DC editor who worked on the Who's Who series. Greenberger spoke with Booster's creator, Dan Jurgens, for a first-person take on the occasion. Most of what was said will be familiar to long-time Booster boosters (much of it is corroborated by what Jurgens had previously told me in my Secret Origin interview) but it's always interesting to hear Jurgens speak of the old days at DC.

Writes Greenberger:

Jurgens pitched the idea to Giordano and was surprised at how quickly the series was picked up. "At the time, DC was a remarkably fun place to work," Jurgens recounted. "They were very, very open to new ideas and concepts. The company was committed to trying new things.

"I was at a convention in Dallas that Dick Giordano and Pat Bastienne were also attending. Dick was always highly encouraging and always said if I had anything in terms of a project idea, to bring it to him.

"We had breakfast before the Con started and I pitched him the basic concept of Booster—where he came from, what motivated him and what would make him different. At that point, I didn’t even have the pitch written out. I believe I had a preliminary sketch.

Booster Gold being born in Dallas makes perfect sense. There are few times/places more associated with American capitalism than Dallas, Texas in the mid-80s. (Booster Gold versus J.R. Ewing!)

Speaking of villains, Jurgens also admits to a lingering affinity for Dirk Davis. Maybe one day Booster's selfish agent will get a shot at redemption. Until then, you can relive his glory days in Booster Gold: The Big Fall when it is released this September.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: dallas dan jurgens dirk davis interview robert greenberger westfieldcomics.com

Monday, May 27, 2019

No Exceptions!

Heroes in Crisis wraps up on Wednesday. King recently spoke with Russ Burlingame, the Internet's #1 Booster Gold reporter, about the series' origins.

Burlingame: This all started with Harley and Booster, and you talked a lot about how much you love those characters and obviously you've gotten to write them a lot. How strange has it been that you spent six months elevating those characters, and now the big takeaway is like "holy s--t, Wally!"?

King: You go back to what I did with Booster in the beginning, and I did it in Batman. It was like "what? What did you do to Booster? You made him so terrible." And now as you see in Heroes in Crisis, he came back from being terrible and now he's kicking ass again. This was always about those three characters. It was a Harley story, a Wally story, and was a Booster story. As I've said many times before, I don't pick the characters for my story; I give my plot to the editors and then the editors pick the characters for me. So I told them in the beginning, "this is what it's going to be -- it's going to be about one hero who's made a mistake and it's going to be about the two heroes that get framed for that mistake." And they said, "okay, it's Booster, Harley, and Wally, those are the three characters." I mean they're a joy to write, I love writing them. That's almost what I miss the most about this book is writing those two. Booster is the most fun character in comics, except maybe Hal Jordan.

I'm pleased that DC editorial is always looking for new places to put Booster Gold. (How about a team book with, say, Blue Beetle?)

You can read the whole interview at ComicBook.com.

Comments (2) | Add a Comment | Tags: comicbook.com heroes in crisis interview russ burlingame tom king

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Across The Jurgensverse

Dan Jurgens recently spoke to Russ Burlingame about the 25th anniversary of the release of Superman/Doomsday: Hunter/Preay. Booster Gold played no role in that series, yet according to Jurgens, he sort of does.

Burlingame: It feels like, even though this is a very stand-alone book, the Waverider stuff plays into the bigger theme of the Linear Men at that time in the books, which is, "Do something, you jerks."

Jurgens: Right. It's weird, I think I probably didn't realize it at the time, but I look back at this now, and realize that what I was doing, I should say, was assembling a group of characters that I created that would function in that world. I think Jim Starlin did a great job of this. When he was doing Captain Marvel, when he was doing Warlock, he created all these characters. They became very much a part of his writing language, and his visual language. All that stuff existed to the extent that it was Jim Starlin-world. Now we see that times 5,000 on the screen. I think what I was doing was a lot of the same thing, which is I said that I have all these characters that interact and they make sense to me. They don't just have to interact once in November of 1992 and then we never see them again. We can use them to address different ideas and different topics.

They became very much a part of -- this is going to sound real egotistical, and I don't want it to-- it becomes part of like "Jurgensverse," as far as I was approaching Superman a little bit. It made sense to me. Whereas at that time, it might have been [convenience], I look back on it now a little differently. It made sense in a lot of different ways. These are the characters I wanted to continue to explore, and there was no reason they had to interact once and then not interact again.

Burlingame: And a lot of these characters and ideas you would continue to work with all the way up through the mid-2000s with your Booster Gold run.

Jurgens: Also, if you look at Waverider, which was a co-creation with Archie Goodwin, you have all these things that fit together and work. think it's a group of concepts that have been probably under-used by DC. I think there's a lot more than could have been done with it, and fortunately that stuff is still out there, so there's a lot more that can be done with it. I think concepts like the Linear Men, like Vanishing Point, and all that stuff, I think that's the kind of thing that has a place in comics. I think there's some cool things there that can still be exploited, still be used.

There's a lot to unpack in just those few paragraphs, and that's only a tiny snippet of the interview. (By all means, read the whole thing on ComicBook.com.)

The most important thing there, obviously, is that we should be calling Jurgens' oeuvre "The Jurgensverse," and that all the characters in it always were, and always will be, connected. That somewhere in 2019, Trixie Collins could pass Mitchell Anderson in the produce aisle of their local supermarket and give him advice on the best way to pick out a grapefruit, that thought makes me very happy.

It's also worth noting that Jurgens believes that Time Masters and their story-telling conceit of policing history remains an untapped source for future stories in the DCrU. That should be encouraging to fans of Booster (and Jurgens' work), as it means that the possibility still exists to revisit the characters and concepts (and unanswered mysteries) of Booster Gold Volume 2.

Here's to the future!

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: comicbook.com dan jurgens doomsday interview russ burlingame superman

Monday, March 18, 2019

Eric Martsolf Done Playing Booster Gold

Booster Gold fans will recognize actor Eric Martsolf as the first (and so far only) actor to play our hero in a live action production. (For the record, that was on the Smallville episode "Booster" airing April 22, 2011 as the 18th episode of the series' 10th season. Remember this?)

Martsolf is still acting on daytime television and was recently interviewed by Michael Maloney for TV Insider during which he reminisced about his Smallville days.

TV Insider: You got to play humor when you played Booster Gold on Smallville. How much fun was that?

Martsolf: That was my favorite role to date. It was funny, heroic, a comic book come to life; I loved getting to play someone who’s completely larger than life. I got credit from my kids for playing a character who’s a member of the Justice League. I still have [fans] from the DC Universe and the Smallville world hit me up on social media, trying to get a Booster Gold movie going on, but now I may have to settle for playing his dad. Then again, he is a time traveler.

TV Insider: Was there anything from the Smallville episode you got to keep? Probably not the Booster Gold costume!

Martsolf: No, that custom-made to my body leather outfit, I think, was more expensive more than my first house was! I did get to keep several of the Booster Gold fan club shirts [that were in the show as a story point]. At the end of the episode, I, as Booster, throw one to Clark (Tom Welling) and say, ‘You’re an XL, right, Clark?’ I remember after the scene I gave Tom a hug [goodbye] and he said take as many of those shirts as you want.

Booster's dad, Jonar Carter, is a thoroughly bad seed. If When Booster ever returns to the screen, Jonar would make a great antagonist. And Martsolf would get another shot at keeping his own "body leather outfit," this time as the masked Supernova. Yes, I would definitely watch that.

(The t-shirt Martsolf mentions seen in the episode, by the way, was the Booster Gold Fan Club t-shirt released in 2009 by Graphitti Designs under license of DC Comics with art by Dan Jurgens.)

You can read the whole article, mostly about Martsolf's experiences on the soap operas Days of Our Lives and Passions, at TVInsider.com.

Comments (1) | Add a Comment | Tags: eric martsolf interview michael maloney smallville television tvinsider.com


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