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Boosterrific.com: The Complete, Annotated Adventures of Booster Gold
Boosterrific.com: The Complete, Annotated Adventures of Booster Gold

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Showing posts 0-5 of 179 matching: blue beetle

Friday, May 10, 2019

The End Is (Slightly Less) Near

Newsarama.com reports that Heroes in Crisis #9 will be delayed a week until May 29. They insinuate that this was an editorial decision to coincide the release with that of the much-delayed Doomsday Clock #10. Is Doctor Manhattan now to blame for the events of Heroes in Crisis, too?

(Side note: when reading Tom King's work, I so often feel like I understand what he was trying to say while simultaneously being terribly frustrated by how he has chosen to try to say it. In that vein, Heroes in Crisis could be one of the most irritating stories I've ever bought. King clearly wants to say some real things about a real public health crisis, but his message gets lost in a murder-mystery with a reveal that is impossible to see coming — the story admits that there are literally no clues — and makes the misguided decision to turn a beloved hero into a super villain [re-writing his powers in the process] in a manner that only serves to reinforce the initial public perceptions that King ostensibly wants to break down. Grr.)

Any-way.

Speaking of Heroes in Crisis, you may have noticed that Booster Gold appears only in flashback in issue #8. At least that's what I thought when I first read it. It was only on re-read that I realized that Booster's looming presence is probably foreshadowed (pun intended) in these panels set in the present.

© DC Comics

See that big, round shadow? The big shadow. Not the little shadows within that shadow. (Does the Speed Force cast shadows now?) It sure seems to me that big round shadow is the Blue Beetle's Bug airship arriving to witness this pivotal scene.

A recent tweeted by Tom King of the splash page for Issue #9, showcasing the Bug streaking across a breathtaking sunset, looks to confirm my theory.

© DC Comics
Art by Clay Mann & Tomeu Morey

Great Caesar's Ghost, that's amazing. My complaints about shadows (and Tom King's style) aside, this series really does have some of the most sublime art ever seen in a mainstream comic book.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: blue beetle clay mann flash heroes in crisis newsarama.com tom king tomeu morey

Monday, April 29, 2019

Statler and Waldorf in Blue and Gold

My two favorite muppets as my two favorite heroes, as sketched by illustrator Neil R King, aka BoldFacedComics on DeviantArt.com.

Statler and Waldorf as booster gold / blue beetle
by BoldFacedComics on deviantart.com

For the record, that's Waldorf wearing Booster's gold and Statler in Beetle blue. Those two old grumps have never dressed better.

Comments (3) | Add a Comment | Tags: blue beetle deviantart.com fan art muppets neil r king statler and waldorf

Friday, April 26, 2019

This Day in History: Booster Gold Dies

It is a cliche in superhero comic books that characters die and then get better. The trope was well established by the time Superman's funeral ignited the general public's imagination, but ever since 1992, you simply aren't a real super hero until you've returned from "the other side" at least once.

Booster Gold joined that not-so-elusive club on this day in 1994 between the panels of Justice League Task Force #13.

© DC Comics

At the time, the Justice League had been fractured into three groups with incompatible philosophies about what constituted "justice." Wonder Woman's "international" faction was most in line with the historic methods of the team as the strong arm of traditional, established political authorities. Martian Manhunter's task force was also aligned with the United Nations, though it preferred less direct means of diffusing problems. Captain Atom, on the other hand, championed more unconventional and forceful means of "extreme" justice, fighting fire with fire, so to speak.

These internal differences were exacerbated by the threat of the alien Overmaster, who had returned to Earth (after a previous encounter with the Justice League a decade earlier) in order to eradicate humanity. He had the power to do it, too. The dysfunctional Justice Leagues America, International, and Task Force have to put aside their differences to stop him. The crossover event, titled "Judgement Day," reads better than many of DC's official "Crisis"s.

Usually, comic book deaths are used as a cheap trick to ramp up the stakes, tug at the heartstrings, or inflate the threat posed by the bad guy. Booster was lucky. He died in a good story that respected established characterization. Specifically, his death was a side-effect of his overconfidence that history couldn't ever be changed, a misunderstanding with tragic consequences.

Of course, that wouldn't mean much unless Booster recovered to learn from his mistake. Spoiler alert: he did.

Comments (6) | Add a Comment | Tags: blue beetle death justice league

Friday, March 22, 2019

Bluesome Twosome

Roll into the weekend with some colorful fan art featuring our favorite duo:

BB and BG with Skeets by SketchItBucket

You can see more work by Steph, aka SketchItBucket, on DeviantArt.com.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: blue beetle deviantart.com fan art sketchitbucket

Monday, February 25, 2019

Boosters Are Gold, Beetles Are BR2

Booster booster Aaron Hale is currently selling ten pages of the original color guide for Justice League International #25 on eBay.com.

© DC Comics

What's a color guide, you ask? Time for a brief history lesson!

Computers and modern printing techniques have changed things, but for most of the history of comics, all hues were printed from a few shades of one of three distinct colors. Below is artist Todd Klein's color chart from the 1980s when he worked at DC Comics. It has codes for each possible color, where "Y" stands for yellow, "B" for blue, and "R" for red. The "2" meant 25% saturation, "3" was 50% saturation, "4" was 75% saturation, and no number was fully saturated, pure color. When JLI #25 was released in 1989, 124 colors were possible.

DC colors expanded on cover stock, via kleinletters.com
DC colors on cover stock via KleinLetters.com

Like a kid with a single box of crayons, the colorist filled in the black and white drawings with watercolor paints to match those colors. The less fun part came after the paint dried. That's when the colorist had to go back over their work to provide the printer of the comic with an appropriate code for each color used so that the image could be reproduced. The colored and coded page was called a color guide, and that's what Aaron is selling.

© DC Comics
Justice League International #25, page 11, panel 1 as planned

(If all that sounds like a lot to do, keep in mind that it was followed by a much more labor-intensive process called color separation. Using the coded pages of the color guide as their template, the color separator would paint sheets of acetate to be used when photographing the original art for transfer to the four printing plates needed for the CYMK color process. Printing comics was hard work!)

© DC Comics
Justice League International #25, page 11, panel 1 as printed

Aaron's auction ends tomorrow, so don't drag your feet. If you'd like to lay your eyes (or your hands) on a bit of Blue and Gold history, hurry over to eBay.com today!

(And if you'd like more information about how comics are made, check out Todd Klein's fine blog at kleinletters.com or Klein's book co-written with Mark Chiarello, The DC Comics Guide to Coloring and Lettering Comics.)

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: aaron b hale blue beetle color ebay.com kleinletters.com todd klein


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