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Boosterrific.com: The Complete, Annotated Adventures of Booster Gold
Boosterrific.com: The Complete, Annotated Adventures of Booster Gold

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Showing posts 0-5 of 36 matching: michael

Friday, April 15, 2022

Coming Soon: Booster Gold, Vampire Hunter

DC Comics' July 2022 solicitations are due out today, but Michael Doran of Newsarama@GamesRadar has already broken some Booster Gold news, specifically that our hero is going to start hunting vampires this summer.

© DC Comics
cover art by Alan Quah

DC vs. Vampires: All-Out War #1 is a new six-issue "all-you-can-eat buffet of grindhouse mayhem" limited series beginning in July that serves as a companion series to the main DC vs. Vampire series, following the companion one-shots DC vs Vampires: Hunters in May and DC vs Vampires: Killers in June.

"One of the last secret, underground human cities is facing total annihilation and its leader - John Constantine - must plan a suicide mission to assassinate a key lieutenant in the vampire empire!" reads DC's description. "Against unreal odds and with an unlikely team including Booster Gold, Deathstroke, and Mary Marvel, does the Hellblazer have one more trick up his sleeve?"

DC vs. Vampires: All-Out War will be written by Matthew Rosenberg and Alex Paknadel with "monochromatic" black-and-white (!) art by Pasquale Qualano.

It's always cool that Booster Gold gets more spotlight, but if the main DC vs. Vampires mini-series is any guide, most of these characters are just going to die very gruesome deaths at the hands of other fallen heroes. If vampires can turn the likes of Wonder Woman and Superman, I don't much care for Booster Gold's chances. (How did he not see this coming?)

Will Booster be seen anywhere else in the DCU in July, perhaps in a book that isn't so... bloodthirsty? I'll certainly be checking GamesRadar.com for updates later today.

UPDATE LATER TODAY: Whoo, boy, it looks like DC really doesn't know what direction it wants to take its properties this summer. An endless series of Dark Crises, Flashpoints, and multiverses of Superman and mechs and vampires and knights and children.... Maybe I'm just getting too old for this.

On the up side, Booster Gold does appear on the solicited cover for Superman: Son of Kal-El #13 by Travis Moore.

© DC Comics

The issue is teased to introduce the television Arrowverse's Dreamer to the DCU (whatever that means anymore), so when it arrives in your Local Comic Shop on July 12, expect it to be a big seller to television watchers who also buy comic books... all 15 of them.

Now get off my lawn.

Comments (1) | Add a Comment | Tags: alan quah dc vs vampires gamesradar.com michael doran newsarama pasquale qualano soliciations

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

New Release: Justice League 67

Look who makes a cameo appearance in today's Justice League #67:

© DC Comics

Er, I meant specifically Booster Gold. He's in the background of several panels, which, frankly, is a bigger presence than he has in most comic books. And at least he's in good company. Vixen and Blue Devil are also here to mutely decorate the backgrounds, and few characters are given any more than a single line of dialog. What you see from longtime League stalwarts Black Canary and Green Arrow above is their only notable contribution to the proceedings. If the Justice League roster needs to include someone with a colorful name to stand around and state the obvious, Booster Gold can do that!

Look, I'm not going to lie. As you can probably tell by now, I don't personally care for Brian Michael Bendis's take on the Justice League. The unique quirks of his personal style aside, his characters don't act much like the DC heroes I've been reading about for decades. I find myself reading his issues as though they represent an alternate-universe team that, while far from "ultimate," could perhaps occupy Earth-B.

(Historical footnote: In the Bronze Age of DC Comics, Earth-B was the unofficial universe of writer Bob Haney's impossible, out-of-continuity Brave and the Bold stories. That universe was presumably destroyed by the Crisis on Infinite Earths. I suggest the new Earth-B in DC's all-new, all-different post-52, post-Death Metal Omniverse cosmology should be home to the stories of Brian Bendis.)

So I can't exactly recommend this title to anyone. But we readers don't get to choose which books Booster Gold appears in, do we? As a great poet once said, "Ours not to reason why, ours but to whine and buy."

Buy this issue and make Skeets happy.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: brian michael bendis justice league new releases

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Gold Beetle Gets What She Deserves

Friend of Boosterrific ("F.O.B") Mike Foster took me to task for spending last Wednesday teasing Green Arrow when I should have been focused the latest Gold Beetle appearance as seen in this panel from that week's Green Lantern #2:

© DC Comics
words by Geoffrey Thorne, art by Dexter Soy, Marco Santucci, Alex Sinclair

Exactly why Gold Beetle appears to be handcuffed is unclear, as this panel is her only appearance in this issue. Perhaps the "present day" Time Masters have finally taken notice of her recent shenanigans in Future State: Suicide Squad #1 and #2 and Flash #768 and #769.

By the way, this would seem to be Gold Beetle's first canonical (objectively documented) meeting with Rip Hunter and Waverider, her previously reported encounter with the "Linear Police" being merely anecdotal (as told by her) and apocryphal (because she's the very definition of an unreliable narrator). Good luck finding a game show that will ask for *that* thinly-sliced bit of comic book trivia.

At the rate Gold Beetle is popping up across DC's new Infinite Frontier, it's only a matter of time (har, har) before she finally comes face to face with Booster Gold and Blue Beetle themselves, maybe in this summer's Blue and Gold mini-series that everyone I won't stop talking about.

Thanks for the correction, Mike.

Comments (1) | Add a Comment | Tags: gold beetle green lantern michael foster new releases

Friday, March 5, 2021

Serious Question

I said at the start of the week that I wanted to talk about Generations Forged, so if you haven't read that yet (or for that matter Generations Shattered or Dark Knights: Death Metal ), beware that spoilers follow.

...

...

You've been warned.

...

You know from cover (and timing) of Generations Shattered, this story takes place in the DC Omniverse created in the wake of Dark Nights: Death Metal.

© DC Comics
Dark Nights: Death Metal #7, January 2021

As if the Omniverse wasn't a big enough concept to take in, it only gets bigger. ("Infinity is just so big that, by comparison, bigness itself looks really titchy," explainsthe Hitchhikers Guide the Galaxy.)

At the end of Generations Forged, as Waverider returns the Batman of 1939 (abducted by Kamandi in Detective Comics #1000) to his native time, he introduces us to another concept:

© DC Comics
Generations Forged #1, February 2021

Waverider goes on to imply that the Batman of 1939 will continue fighting into the modern day, that the Batmen of all publishing ages (Golden, Silver, Modern) are the same character (who may or may not have memories of all of his adventures.)

While the Omniverse just increases the size of the bucket for potential story settings, the Linearverse is a radical revision to understanding DC Comics' publishing history.

For GamesRadar.com, Michael Doran has already written several articles on the implications of this revelation, each quoting Generations Forged architect Dan Jurgens on his intent with this new Linearverse.

"It's fair to say that what we built here, the Linearverse, is its own universe that can fit into the larger context of DC's Omniverse," explains Jurgens. "It's a place where some unique and individual stories can be told."

Jurgens himself admits that this is an imperfect solution to an artificial problem. Comic book fans have always struggled with reconciling how Dick Grayson could be a boy in 1940 and still a young man in 2020 or how both Superboy and Superman could each have co-existing adventures for most of 80 years. These are only "problems" when trying to reconcile the lives of fictional characters with the passage of nonfictional time, but they are problems that fans have nonetheless tried to resolve for as long as we've been reading and relating to new monthly comics.

I don't mean to suggest that I think the Linearverse is necessarily any worse than any other attempt at reconciling the impossible. From my restricted point of view as the chronicler of the adventures of multiversal time-traveler Booster Gold, I've always attempted to to harmonize the many incarnations of Booster Gold onto a single entity, albeit an occasionally fractured and splintered one. That's no so different from what happens in the Linearverse.

So, to finally get to the serious question I referenced in my post title, what I want to know is whether the adventure told in Generations Shattered and Generations Forged happened to a Booster Gold in a previously existing continuity or not? The rules as explained for the new Linearverse would seem to suggest it happened to all known Boosters while at the same time happening to none of them, or maybe only those that exist inside a Linearverse that reflects the sum of all other universes.

For reasons I can't quite express, I don't find any of these options entirely satisfying (thought that may not be surprising coming from someone who obsessively tracks super hero minutia for a hobby).

Perhaps there is no definitive answer to my question, at least not yet. As GameRadar reports,

"There are all sorts of stories and adventures worth exploring in the Linearverse," Jurgens concludes. "If readers like what they've seen, react well to the concept, and ask for more, it might just happen."

Like so much else, maybe the answer to my question will only become clearer with time.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: batman dan jurgens gamesradar.com generations linearverse michael doran multiverse omniverse superman

Monday, November 30, 2020

Well Read

My friends Mike and Keith are big fans of "The Dresden Files" books by Jim Butcher, and they were eager to tell me that Booster Gold is name-checked in the latest book, Battle Ground, as you can see below.

Battle Ground by Jim Butcher

That page makes no sense to me, but I suppose jumping into any novel on page 153 would be confusing.

Despite my friends' urging, I have not read any of "The Dresden Files" books. I bought the first one, Storm Front, but only got through the first chapter before loaning it to my father, who was looking for something new to read in the hospital. I haven't seen it since (though Dad has now read the first 16 in the series).

Apparently, fans of the series know what I didn't, that protagonist wizard Harry Dresden — as Wikipedia tells us:

Harry prefers to drive his Volkswagen Beetle because the simple technology powering it makes it less likely to be adversely affected by his magic, and it can be fixed easily. He refers to it as the "Blue Beetle" due to its original color, though damage by supernatural creatures has forced him to replace several pieces of the bodywork in different colors.

Despite Harry's objection, comic book fans will agree that "Booster Gold" is the prefect callsign for someone associated with the Blue Beetle.

For the record, Battle Ground, the 17th "Dresden" book, was released in September. It can now be found in fine bookstores everywhere (and I'm sure it will make a good gift for my father this Christmas).

Comments (4) | Add a Comment | Tags: battle ground blue beetle dresden files jim butcher keith adamson michael foster wikipedia.com


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