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Boosterrific.com: The Complete, Annotated Adventures of Booster Gold
Boosterrific.com: The Complete, Annotated Adventures of Booster Gold

It has been 111 Days since Booster Gold last appeared in a DCnU comic book.

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Showing posts 0-5 of 215 matching: dan jurgens

Friday, September 6, 2019

In Praise of LoSH Millennium

SPOILER WARNING: Today's topic could be considered a spoiler for Legion of Super-Heroes: Millennium #1, so scroll no further if you want to be surprised.

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Brian Michael Bendis has been very careful to disguise the identity of his series protagonist, a character familiar to longtime DC Comics enthusiasts. However, I don't think I'm giving much away to say that character is the split personality anti-hero(s) Rose and Thorn, who has somehow gained immortality and is left wandering through the "future" timeline of DC mainstream continuity on her way of reintroducing the Legion of Super-Heroes to a new generation of readers.

I think that's a pretty cool way to immerse an audience into the deep-end of continuity, in no small part because Rose/Thorn played the same role for Booster Gold back in 1986.

In 2015, I asked Dan Jurgens why he chose to use Rose in his original Booster Gold series. He said

First of all, I found her to be an amazingly interesting character.

Plus, since [Rose and Thorn] hadn't appeared in such a long time, it was fairly easy to adjust the character a bit. Tweak the costume, etc. Tailor it to Booster a bit more, that kind of thing.

As you can see, Bendis is taking a page from Jurgens' playbook here. We're not mad; Bendis is including Booster Gold in the next issue to re-encounter his old partner. Although Booster will be younger and Rose will be much, much older than their last meeting. Such are the pitfalls of time travel.

You'll find Legion of Super-Heroes: Millennium #2 in your Local Comic Shop on October 2.

Comments (1) | Add a Comment | Tags: brian michael bendis dan jurgens legion of super-heroes thorn

Monday, July 29, 2019

My Favorite Covers: Action Comics 594

It is a truth universally acknowledged that every comic book heroes will inevitably get in a fist fight with every other hero. Such was the case with Booster Gold and Superman early in Booster's career.

Every new super hero in a shared universe needs guest appearances from more famous characters to drive new readers to their title. Hence Superman's appearance in Booster Gold #6 and #7.

© DC Comics
Pencils by Dan Jurgens, Inks by Mike DeCarlo

Not coincidentally, Dan Jurgens took the opportunity of a visit from the established star — in his very first appearance in the newly-merged post-Crisis on Infinite Earths DC Universe continuity — to reveal Booster's less-than-stellar origin tale. The image on the cover correlated well with the shock and disgust that audiences felt discovering that they had been reading the tale of a gambler and a thief. Superman was giving our hero nothing less than what many of us felt he deserved.

But the story doesn't end there.

Because Dan Jurgens was kind enough to accommodate John Byrne's post-Crisis revamp of Superman in the aforementioned issues, Byrne let Booster guest in Action Comics #594. The cover to that might look familiar; turnabout is fair play.

© DC Comics
Pencils by John Byrne, Inks by Keith Williams

Once again, the cover was figuratively true. Booster had been growing into the role of a true hero, and history had been proven to be on his side. The story inside plays on Booster's bad reputation following the earlier story, making the cover reversal doubly sweet.

Aren't these some great covers? As a fan of traditional fine art, I love that the extremely foreshortened poses turn the heroes into grotesques personifying the ugly, violent acts that they are engaged in. As a fan of comic book artists, it's particularly interesting to compare young Jurgens' early take on Superman to Byrne's more iconic character (and also to Jurgens' future interpretation).

As a fan of comic book super heroes, it's just great to see two heroes going head-to-head.

Comments (3) | Add a Comment | Tags: covers dan jurgens favorite covers john byrne keith williams mike decarlo superman

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

For Your Consideration

Westfield Comics has posted an article detailing the origins of Booster Gold Volume 1 in advance of the reprinting of those issues for the upcoming Booster Gold: The Big Fall hardcover.

The article was written by Robert Greenberger, a former DC editor who worked on the Who's Who series. Greenberger spoke with Booster's creator, Dan Jurgens, for a first-person take on the occasion. Most of what was said will be familiar to long-time Booster boosters (much of it is corroborated by what Jurgens had previously told me in my Secret Origin interview) but it's always interesting to hear Jurgens speak of the old days at DC.

Writes Greenberger:

Jurgens pitched the idea to Giordano and was surprised at how quickly the series was picked up. "At the time, DC was a remarkably fun place to work," Jurgens recounted. "They were very, very open to new ideas and concepts. The company was committed to trying new things.

"I was at a convention in Dallas that Dick Giordano and Pat Bastienne were also attending. Dick was always highly encouraging and always said if I had anything in terms of a project idea, to bring it to him.

"We had breakfast before the Con started and I pitched him the basic concept of Booster—where he came from, what motivated him and what would make him different. At that point, I didn’t even have the pitch written out. I believe I had a preliminary sketch.

Booster Gold being born in Dallas makes perfect sense. There are few times/places more associated with American capitalism than Dallas, Texas in the mid-80s. (Booster Gold versus J.R. Ewing!)

Speaking of villains, Jurgens also admits to a lingering affinity for Dirk Davis. Maybe one day Booster's selfish agent will get a shot at redemption. Until then, you can relive his glory days in Booster Gold: The Big Fall when it is released this September.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: dallas dan jurgens dirk davis interview robert greenberger westfieldcomics.com

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Across The Jurgensverse

Dan Jurgens recently spoke to Russ Burlingame about the 25th anniversary of the release of Superman/Doomsday: Hunter/Preay. Booster Gold played no role in that series, yet according to Jurgens, he sort of does.

Burlingame: It feels like, even though this is a very stand-alone book, the Waverider stuff plays into the bigger theme of the Linear Men at that time in the books, which is, "Do something, you jerks."

Jurgens: Right. It's weird, I think I probably didn't realize it at the time, but I look back at this now, and realize that what I was doing, I should say, was assembling a group of characters that I created that would function in that world. I think Jim Starlin did a great job of this. When he was doing Captain Marvel, when he was doing Warlock, he created all these characters. They became very much a part of his writing language, and his visual language. All that stuff existed to the extent that it was Jim Starlin-world. Now we see that times 5,000 on the screen. I think what I was doing was a lot of the same thing, which is I said that I have all these characters that interact and they make sense to me. They don't just have to interact once in November of 1992 and then we never see them again. We can use them to address different ideas and different topics.

They became very much a part of -- this is going to sound real egotistical, and I don't want it to-- it becomes part of like "Jurgensverse," as far as I was approaching Superman a little bit. It made sense to me. Whereas at that time, it might have been [convenience], I look back on it now a little differently. It made sense in a lot of different ways. These are the characters I wanted to continue to explore, and there was no reason they had to interact once and then not interact again.

Burlingame: And a lot of these characters and ideas you would continue to work with all the way up through the mid-2000s with your Booster Gold run.

Jurgens: Also, if you look at Waverider, which was a co-creation with Archie Goodwin, you have all these things that fit together and work. think it's a group of concepts that have been probably under-used by DC. I think there's a lot more than could have been done with it, and fortunately that stuff is still out there, so there's a lot more that can be done with it. I think concepts like the Linear Men, like Vanishing Point, and all that stuff, I think that's the kind of thing that has a place in comics. I think there's some cool things there that can still be exploited, still be used.

There's a lot to unpack in just those few paragraphs, and that's only a tiny snippet of the interview. (By all means, read the whole thing on ComicBook.com.)

The most important thing there, obviously, is that we should be calling Jurgens' oeuvre "The Jurgensverse," and that all the characters in it always were, and always will be, connected. That somewhere in 2019, Trixie Collins could pass Mitchell Anderson in the produce aisle of their local supermarket and give him advice on the best way to pick out a grapefruit, that thought makes me very happy.

It's also worth noting that Jurgens believes that Time Masters and their story-telling conceit of policing history remains an untapped source for future stories in the DCrU. That should be encouraging to fans of Booster (and Jurgens' work), as it means that the possibility still exists to revisit the characters and concepts (and unanswered mysteries) of Booster Gold Volume 2.

Here's to the future!

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: comicbook.com dan jurgens doomsday interview russ burlingame superman

Friday, April 12, 2019

The Lost Art of Dan Jurgens

Let's make a whole week out of Dan Jurgens' Twitter feed! I wouldn't normally do that, but Dan has shared some pretty good Booster Gold-related stuff lately, like this tease of the original, unused art from Booster Gold #6 (1986).

Sometimes, the unpublished stuff is the fun stuff. From 1986, Booster Gold #6. Origin story that was pulled for last minute changes as Superman was overhauled. --@thedanjurgens 13 Mar 2019

A bit of background: Booster Gold #6 was the first telling of Booster's origin story, which was originally tied more closely to the Silver Age Superman mythos. For example, the Space Museum was originally intended to be the Superman Museum, and Booster's Flight Ring was going to be the ring that the Legion of Super-Heroes gave to Superboy. (See my 2010 interview with Jurgens for more details.)

The pages seen in that tweet are very likely the original story, before Jurgens had to change it to work with the new origin that John Byrne was giving Superman in the pages of The Man of Steel. It's super-cool that Jurgens still has them. Maybe one day, he'll let us see the whole thing. (In a Booster Gold Omnibus, maybe?)

And before we sign off for the weekend, here's one more tweet from Jurgens, a Booster Gold sketch commission.

Variant cover idea. If there was a book. Which there isn't. --@thedanjurgens 25 Mar 2019

See? Twitter *is* useful for more than just rants and bullying. Thanks, Dan!

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: commissions dan jurgens fan art original art twitter.com


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