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Boosterrific.com: The Complete, Annotated Adventures of Booster Gold
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Showing posts 0-5 of 57 matching: chris

Friday, June 18, 2021

Growing Up in a New-Fashioned World, Part 2

Childhood is a time of learning about the world around you and preparing you for the future. But what if your childhood won't happen for another few centuries and your future is in the past? That's the case for time-traveling hero Booster Gold, whose 25th-century upbringing may not have prepared him for 21st-century life.

Nostalgic for the Future: How

HEALTHCARE: In the 2460s, Michael "Booster" Carter's mother will be diagnosed with a fatal degenerative disease that can only be treated in a specialized zero gravity facility on the moon. Certainly, such an operation is beyond the reach of 21st-century science, but it will present Booster with a problem all too familiar to present-day Americans: where to get the money to pay for it?

© DC Comics
Secret Origins #35

It's more than a little disappointing that life-saving healthcare will remain beyond the reach of too many even 400 years from now. Booster's solution will change his life not for the better, however, the lesson he will learn and a sympathetic understanding of the problems facing citizens in all eras will be an asset for the hero he will eventually become.

TRANSPORTATION: For about as long as there have been automobiles, prognisticators have been predicting that they will one-day fly. And they're right. By the 25th century, even school busses will take to the air.

© DC Comics
Booster Gold #15

When Booster Gold debuted in Metropolis, he had super strength and an invulnerable force field. Yet ordinary 16-year-olds had a power he didn't: the ability to drive an eathbound car. No wonder his first 20th-century vehicle was a chauffeured limousine!

HOLIDAYS: If, like Charlie Brown, you think that Christmas has gone too commercial in the 21st century, you probably don't want to see how they celebrate the holiday in the year 2462.

© DC Comics
Booster Gold #15

Each December, Booster Gold must feel right at home no matter what century he's in.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: christmas flying cars healthcare nostalgic for the future

Friday, December 25, 2020

A Traditional Boosterrific Christmas

This holiday, I give you not the Christmas you asked for but the Christmas you deserve.

© DC Comics
Justice League Task Force #37 (1996)

Merry Christmas, everyone. Drink up.

Comments (3) | Add a Comment | Tags: christmas holidays justice league task force

Monday, November 9, 2020

Two of a Kind: Shattered and Forged

If you read Detective Comics #1027 back in September, you might remember its last page:

© DC Comics

When I saw that last panel, I thought, "what the heck is Generations: Future State?" The answer wasn't immediately clear because DC was keeping its plans to itself.

We eventually learned that Future State is going to be a two-month alternate-Earth event interrupting whatever it is that passes for continuity in the DC Rebirth Universe. But how would this new title connect to Dan Jurgens' Generations comic which we'd already heard solicited as Generations: Shattered? (Or was Generations: Shattered a different book altogether? How many Generations books were there going to be?)

Despite what we may have guessed, according to Newsarama Senior Editor Chris Arrant, they aren't related at all.

"Originally, we were going to touch on what's coming with Future State," Dan Jurgens, one of Generations' writer/artists told Newsarama. "We're detouring from that a bit to focus more on our own story."

In other words, for readers under the impression that Generations: Future State #1 (as mentioned in Detective Comics #1027) on September 15 and Generations: Shattered #1 announced by DC on September 9 are two distinct projects, they are not. They are one and the same. The one-shot was renamed from 'Future State #1' to 'Shattered #1' sometimes in between its September 9 announcement and whenever Detective Comics #1027 went to the printers prior to that. DC has also seemingly made the editorial decision to remove any story connection between Generations and Shattered.

The 'Generations' story will play out next in January 5's Generations: Shattered, and then continue in February with Generations: Forged.

Whew, 2020 has been a mess, hasn't it? Thanks to Newsarama for finally setting that record straight and untangling all those names and projects. (I recommend that you read the full article at at Gamesradar.com for all the details.)

Personally, I'm glad that the two events are unlinked. Future State sounds like it's going to be a lot, and I still suffer a little PTSD from trying to keep up with all those Convergence mini-series back in 2015.

Comments (0) | Add a Comment | Tags: chris arrant dan jurgens detective comics future state gamesradar.com generations

Friday, May 15, 2020

The Best of Booster Gold: JL Quarterly 1

Let me go ahead and say this up front: While Justice League #4 is my personal favorite comic book of all time, Justice League Quarterly #1 is a very close second. That makes it an obvious choice to be in my list of the twelve best Booster Gold comics.

What makes Justice League Quarterly #1 so great? I'll let Claire Montgomery explain.

© DC Comics
© DC Comics
© DC Comics

In hindsight, a corporate-sponsored super team seems like such an obvious idea. In the late 1980s, corporate America was ascendant. When the Justice League went international with the backing of the United Nations, it was inevitable that private industry would want to strike back with super heroes they could control. Who better to lead such an endeavor than Booster Gold, the DCU's original Corporate Crusader?

© DC Comics

In a Justice League issue, it would be easy to treat the Conglomerate as either a bunch of bumbling boobs (like the Injustice League) or as a souless gang of misguided thugs (like the Rocket Red Brigade). Instead, writers Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis present the new team — including a couple of faces and names that will be familiar to "Justice League Detroit" fans — as a group worthy of respect, trying to do good inside the structure of an imperfect system.

The villains in this story aren't the corporate super team but their big-money bosses. With names like Mr. Whiteman and Mrs. Karpedeim, it's perfectly clear what we're supposed to think about a Capitalistic culture that values heroism as useful only so long as it sells another gallon of gas.

What happens when a group of well-intentioned heroes are confronted with the very difficult reality that saving money is more important that saving lives? Read on to find out.

© DC Comics

If you think a story of super hero ethics isn't interesting enough to hold your interest for 70 pages, this issue has a few surprises for you. In addition to a very cynical look at American business culture, there are several character-driven subplots playing out around around that core, most importantly including the relationship between Booster Gold and his former BFF, Blue Beetle.

© DC Comics

I love this book. I love the art by Chris Sprouse and Bruce Patterson. I love the Conglomerate's team uniform is a leather jacket covered with corporate patches. I love that team manager Claire Montgomery is Max Lord's ex-wife. I love that Booster Gold is forced to appear in a publicity photo with former business rival Lex Luthor. I love that Green Lantern foe Hector Hammond thinks he's not evil enough for corporate America.

And most importantly, I love that Booster and Beetle are making an effort to work through their differences.

In other words, I love Justice League Quarterly #1, and that's all the reason I need to include it among the The Best Booster Gold Stories Ever.

(Just so you know, this issue has very recently been reprinted — for the first time! — in the Justice League: Corporate Maneuvers collection. Next time you visit your Local Comic Shop, consider picking up a copy. I love mine!)

Comments (1) | Add a Comment | Tags: best of bruce patterson chris sprouse claire montgomery conglomerate j.m. dematteis justice league quarterly keith giffen

Wednesday, December 25, 2019

Justice League Christmas Force

This holiday, I re-gift you once again the panel that just keeps on giving.

© DC Comics
Justice League Task Force #37 (1996)

Merry Christmas, everyone. Enjoy your adult beverages responsibly.

Comments (1) | Add a Comment | Tags: christmas holidays justice league task force


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